The Atlantic Salmon Ecosystems Forum

January 17 - 18, 2018
University of Maine, Orono ME
Wells Conference Center

Schedule At a Glance

View the Schedule At a Glance here (PDF).

Full Program

View the 2018 ASEF Full Program is available here (PDF).

January 17, 2018

7:00-8:00 REGISTRATION - Refreshments provided

8:00 Welcome ~ Mark Renkawitz, Fisheries Biologist, NOAA-Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Session 1: Climate Related Impacts and Resiliency

Carl Wilson, Director, Bureau of Marine Science, Maine DMR, Moderator

8:05-8:25 Atlantic salmon recovery as Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management - Jon Hare, Science and Research Director, NOAA-Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

8:25-9:10 Understanding the differences between watershed restoration prioritization methods - George Pess, Watershed Program Manager, NOAA-Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

9:10-9:25 River flood seasonality in the Northeast United States and trends in annual timing - Mathias J. Collins, NOAA-Fisheries, NOAA Restoration Center

9:25-9:40 Climate related changes in the hydrology of New England - Robert W. Dudley, United States Geological Survey, New England Water Science Center

9:40-9:55 ICNet Infrastructure and Climate Network - Charlie Hebson, Environmental Office, Maine Department of Transportation

9:55-10:10 Reflections on the lack of success of the Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Restoration Program - Stephen R. Gephard, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

10:10-10:50 BREAK - refreshments provided

10:50-11:20 Climate trends and ecosystem impacts in the Gulf of Maine and Northwest Atlantic - Andrew Pershing, Chief Scientific Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

11:20-11:35 Atlantic salmon in a changing climate - Timothy Sheehan, NOAA-Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

11:35-11:50 Habitat condition changes and biological implications for Atlantic salmon at sea - Katherine E. Mills, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

11:50-12:05 Impacts of a changing ecosystem on Atlantic salmon growth - Felix Massiot-Granier, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

In memorium - Jed Wright, United States Fish and Wildlife Service

12:05-13:20 LUNCH - lunch at the Student Union (not provided)

Session II: Estuarine and Marine Ecology

Patrick Dockens, Wildlife Biologist, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Moderator

13:20-13:35 Using otolith microchemistry to infer habitat use of American shad prior to dam removal in the Penobscot River, Maine - Kevin Job, University of Maine, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Conservation Biology

13:35-13:50 Verification of circulus deposition rates in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts from three Maine rivers - Erin Peterson, University of Maine, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Conservation Biology

13:50 - 14:05 Estimating annual consumption rate of Atlantic salmon smolt (Salmo salar) by striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Miramichi Estuary - Jason Daniels, Atlantic Salmon Federation

14:05-14:20 The problem may not be where we think it is: A critical review of the critical period hypothesis in salmon - Marc Trudel, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. Andrews Biological Station & University of Victoria, Department of Biology

14:20-14:35 Relating fluctuations in fish abundance to river restoration efforts and environmental conditions in the Penobscot River, Maine - Gayle B. Zydlewski (for Constantin C. Scherelis), University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences

14:35-14:50 Partitioning the big blue box: A synthesis of marine and estuary action team science - John F. Kocik, ASERT Chief, NOAA-Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center of Biology

14:50-15:30 BREAK - refreshments provided

Session III: Habitat Restoration, Conservation and Management

Patrick Dockens, Wildlife Biologist, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Moderator

15:30-15:45 Status Update: three years of restoration and project development using the NOAA Penobscot habitat focus area grant - Jeremy Bell, The Nature Conservancy

15:45-16:00 Prioritizing barriers to aquatic connectivity in the Penobscot River watershed - Erik H. Martin, The Nature Conservancy

16:00-16:15 Restoring riverine habitat in the upper Narraguagus watershed - Joan G. Trial, Project SHARE

16:15-16:30 PIT-tagged particle study of bed mobility on the Narraguagus River - Douglas M. Thompson, Connecticut College, Environmental Studies Program

16:30-16:45 Maine Atlantic Salmon in-lieu fee program for compensatory mitigation - Ruth M. Ladd, US Army Corps of Engineers

16:45-17:00 The Maine Atlantic salmon programmatic (MAP) for transportation projects: a success story for consultation process streamlining and ecological benefits - Eric Ham, Maine Department of Transportation

17:00-19:00 Poster Session and Social - refreshments provided, beer and wine are available

19:00 An evening with George Pess, NOAA-Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center: An informal presentation and slideshow of the Elwha River Restoration Project - Black Bear Brewing Co.

Poster Presentations

Watershed-scale connectivity analysis: An applied GIS model towards the strategic management of barriers to Atlantic salmon migration - Michael Arsenault, University of New Brunswick, Department of Biology

Optimizing strategies to hydraulically plant Atlantic salmon eggs based on fry dispersal patterns - Ernie Atkinson, Maine Department of Marine Resources

International Year of the Salmon - Kristen Bronger, Integrated Statistics, Woods Hole, MA (Duty Station is GARFO)

Incorporating geomorphology and applying large wood science and channel design in habitat restoration - Michael Burke, Interfluve

Lipid content of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) sampled at West Greenland - Audrey Dean, University of Waterloo, Department of Biology

Comparative analysis of estuarine fish diets after restoration of Alewife populations in Penobscot River Watershed - Emma Dennison, University of Southern Maine, Department of Environmental Science and Policy

The effects of post-surgical recovery time and time of day release on the performance and survival of emigrating Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) smolts from the Miramichi River - Heather J. Dixon (Eric B. Brunsdon presenting), The Atlantic Salmon Federation

Temporal change and variation in marine growth of North American Atlantic salmon sampled from West Greenland - Brandon C. Ellingson, Biologist, Integrated Statistics, Woods Hole, MA

Getting Over the Dam: Overcoming institutional barriers to the recovery of Atlantic salmon by navigating the social-science/policy interface - Melissa E. Flye, University of Maine, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science

Alternative aging methods for Atlantic Sturgeon: Research to improve management of a pre-historic natural resource - Tarren Giberti, University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences

Prey availability and diet of Sturgeon in the Gulf of Maine - Rachel Howland, University of Maine, Department of Marine Science

Effects of alewife predation on zooplankton communities in three Maine lakes - Ericka A. Hutchinson, University of Southern Maine, Department of Environmental Science and Policy

Evaluating morphometric techniques to determine sex of Shortnose Sturgeon in the Penobscot River, Maine - Samantha Nadeau, University of Maine, School of Marine Science

Developing an ecosystem-based fisheries management framework for the Eastern Maine Coastal Current - Joshua Stoll, University of Maine and Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries

Artificial selection on reproductive timing in hatchery salmon drives potential maladaptation to warming waters - Michael D. Tillotson, University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

Where did all the salmon go? The combined impacts of acid rain and forestry are preventing Atlantic salmon recovery in Downeast Maine - Mark C. Whiting, Downeast Salmon Federation

Reducing Acidification in Endangered Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Habitat - Emily Zimmermann, Maine Department of Environmental Protection

January 18, 2018

7:00-8:00 REGISTRATION – refreshments provided

Session IV: Emerging Partnerships

Joshua Royte, Senior Conservation Scientist, The Nature Conservancy, Moderator

8:05-8:20 The importance of effective partnerships to aquatic restoration efforts - Benjamin Naumann, U.S. Department of Agriculture - Natural Resources Conservation Service

8:20-8:35 An update on the species in the spotlight initiative for Atlantic salmon - Julie Crocker, Acting Assistant Regional Administrator of Protected Species, NOAA-Fisheries, Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office

8:35-8:50 The Atlantic salmon research joint venture - “Shaping the future of wild Atlantic salmon science and conservation” - Patricia Edwards, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Gulf Region Fisheries Centre

8:50-9:05 International year of the salmon – why it matters for Maine - Kimberly Damon Randall, Acting Deputy Regional Administrator, NOAA-Fisheries, Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office

9:05-9:20 The World Fish Migration Foundation - Joshua Royte, The Nature Conservancy

9:20-10:00 Developing, maintaining, and sustaining lasting partnerships (Discussion) - Josh Royte, The Nature Conservancy

10:00-10:40 BREAK - refreshments provided

Session V: Tracking and Telemetry

Daniel McCaw, Fisheries Program Manager, Penobscot Indian Nation, Moderator

10:45-11:00 System-wide survival of downstream-migrating Atlantic salmon smolts in the Penobscot River, Maine - Alejandro Molina-Moctezuma, University of Maine, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology

11:00-11:15 Behavioral and physical factors influence migratory success of sockeye salmon smolts in a high-risk landscape - Nathan B. Furey, University of New Hampshire, Department of Biological Sciences

11:15-11:30 Movement and behavior of acoustic tagged Alewife in the Concord and Merrimack River (Alosa psuedoharengus) - Michael Bailey, US Fish and Wildlife Service – CNE Fishery Resources Office

11:30-11:45 Radio-tracking wild and SAS Atlantic salmon in the Northwest Miramichi River - Ryan Carrow, University of New Brunswick, Canadian Rivers Institute

11:45-12:00 Space matters: effects of a conservation translocation program on Atlantic salmon size-at-age - Danielle Frechette, Institute National de Recherche Scientifique, Centre Eau Terre Environnement, Québec

12:00-12:15 Post-spawned Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) overwinter behaviour and spring migration in relation to the large reservoir of the Mactaquac Generation Station, NB, Canada- Amanda Babin, University of New Brunswick, Canadian Rivers Institute

12:10-13:30 LUNCH - lunch at the Student Union (not provided)

Session VI: Freshwater Ecology

Daniel McCaw, Fisheries Program Manager, Penobscot Indian Nation, Moderator

13:30-13:45 Monitoring the Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) run in the Miramichi River using imaging sonar – first full monitoring season 2017 - Jani Helminen, University of New Brunswick, Canadian Rivers Institute and Department of Biology

13:45-14:00 Habitat selection by juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) using a functional regression model - Jeremie Boudreault, Université du Québec, INRS-ETE

14:00-14:15 Water temperature in a changing climate: the response of juvenile Atlantic salmon populations across Eastern Canada - Sébastien Ouellet-Proulx , Institut de la echerché Scientifique – Centre Eau Terre Environnement, Quebec

14:15-14:30 Population characteristics of sub-adult Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrhynchus) in the Penobscot River, Maine - Catlin Ames, University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences

14:30-14:45 An overview of 12 Years (2006 – 2017) of sturgeon research on the Penobscot River - Kevin Lachapelle, University of Maine, School of Marine Science

14:45-15:00 “Closing the Loop”: Anadromous sea lamprey carcasses influence larval conspecifics - Daniel M. Weaver, University of Maine, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Conservation Biology

15:00-15:35 BREAK – refreshments provided

Session VII: Long Term Strategy and Monitoring

Daniel McCaw, Fisheries Program Manager, Penobscot Indian Nation, Moderator

15:35-15:50 Fish passage at hydropower dams on the Penobscot and Kennebec Rivers: A content analysis of the FERC eLibrary Database - Sarah Vogel, University of Maine, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology

15:50-16:05 Acid rain mitigation and complementary initiatives lead to encouraging signs of Atlantic salmon recovery - Edmund A. Halfyard, The Nova Scotia Salmon Association

16:05-16:20 Atlantic salmon in Maine: Assessment of temporal and spatial genetic diversity, and how genetic data is used for to help inform restoration activities in the hatchery and natural environment - Meredith L. Bartron, US Fish and Wildlife Service - Northeast Fishery Center

16:20-16:35 Applying eDNA tools to salmon ecosystems - Michael T. Kinnison, University of Maine - School of Biology and Ecology

16:35-16:50 A collaborative model for Atlantic salmon recovery in Fundy National Park of Canada - Corey Clarke, Parks Canada - Fundy National Park

16:50-16:55 Student Awards - Karen Wilson, Associate Research Professor, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, Award Presenter

16:55-17:00 Closing Remarks - Sean Hayes, Protected Species Branch Chief, NOAA-Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

ADJOURN

Schedule At a Glance

View the Schedule At a Glance here (PDF).

Full Program

View the 2018 ASEF Full Program is available here (PDF).